HUNTERS BAR, SHEFFIELD

HUNTERS BAR, SHARROW VALE ROAD, PORTER COTTAGE, ECCLESHALL ROAD, SHEFFIELD, HUNTERS BAR

Hunters Bar Roundabout.

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There’s a statue of Queen Victoria at the Hunters Bar entrance to Endcliffe Park.


This Statue was created by Alfred Turner (b.1887, d 1940) and was commissioned by Public Subscription. In the Tate Britain Archive there is a copy of the agreement (dated 13th June 1905) between Turner and the Sheffield authorities stating Turner was paid £ 3000 for his work.


The statue was unveiled by Princess Beatrice (a.k.a. Princess Henry of Battenberg) on 11 May 1905. The statue was originally erected at Fargate, sited at the junction of Fargate and Leopold Street, where it replaced the 'Jubilee Memorial' (now sited in Endcliffe Park), but was moved to Endcliffe Park in 1930.


 In 1901 Turner exhibited at the Royal Academy a marble statue entitled “Fisher girl; for a niche”. The success of "Fishergirl" is thought to have assisted Turner in securing commissions for three public monuments in bronze of Queen Victoria who had died in 1901. One was for Delhi, another for Tynemouth and the third statue for Sheffield. This third monument was a much more involved composition than the other two and included a twice life-size statue of Queen Victoria and figures of a mother and her children and a Sheffield workman. The figure of Queen Victoria is made with some skill and despite being twice life size it gives the impression of a diminutive woman, which Queen Victoria was.



Her face looks down to the spot where one naturally stands to view the monument and thus engages with the spectator. The figure itself is about 3 metres high and is of a crowned Queen Victoria holding an orb and sceptre standing on top of a plinth of limestone blocks.


She is attended by two bronze figures representing Maternity and Labour seated on either side of the main plinth, each about 2m high. 'Maternity' is a young woman holding a baby with her left arm around a young girl. 'Labour' is a young man sitting on an anvil with a sledgehammer propped against his left knee. In a file of press cuttings held at Tate Archives one critic likened the head of the labourer to Rodin’s “Le Penseur”. The statue also has some reliefs, one is a small (c.1.0 x 0.5 m high) showing 3 standing figures: St George holding a lance and shield, Justice holding a sword and blindfolded, and a nude woman with drapes. The base of this bronze is signed: "ALFRED TURNER SC. 1904". The front bears the following inscription: "ERECTED BY CITIZENS OF SHEFFIELD IN MEMORY OF A GREAT QUEEN MDCCCCIV".


The rear of the monument has a second inscription: "VICTORIA BORN MAY 24 1819 REIGNED 1837 - 1901". Above this is another relief showing St George killing the dragon. The whole piece is mounted on three granite steps; the bronzes weigh 21/2 tons, the base 50 tons.


Local History: Hunters Bar

Local History: Hunters Bar

Local History: Hunters Bar

Local History: Hunters Bar

(true facts courtesy of @tracemoore)

Hunters Bar in 1967 - interesting to note that the route number was ‘82’ even then....

Yet another monument that was removed from town and dumped in Endcliffe Park when it became un-cool.


The Jubilee Obelisk was originally sited at the top of Fargate (you know, where that horrible round fountain used to be? You do! The one that was full of litter and once a week, some wag would empty a bottle of fairy liquid in to it.)




Queen Victoria's Jubilee Obelisk (1887)


The obelisk was put at the top of Fargate in 1887 and then moved in 1905 to make way for the self-same statue of Victoria that is described above.


It consists of obelisk of red polished granite set above a carved stone capitol above a block of grey polished granite. This latter carried an inscription:

"ERECTED TO COMMEMORATE THE JUBILEE OF QUEEN VICTORIA 1887"

The obelisk is mounted on stone blocks set on a paved area on a patch of levelled ground overlooking the playing fields in the park. The gas lamps have been removed from their holders (which are still there).


The Jubilee Obelisk has been daubed with some graffiti which reveals the spectacularly liberal nature of Hunters Bar.


I very much like dogs” and “Hitler is a mong”.


Give me strength.

Randolph Douglas (Houdini’s Mate)

On Carrington Road (you know - it runs parallel to Rustlings Road), Hunters Bar, there used to live an escapologist called Randolph Douglas.  He was buddies with Harry Houdini who used to stay there frequently.  In the attic room there are holes in the rafters where they used to perfect tricks.


The whole story is covered in a book by local historian Anne Beedham.


More here:


http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/randolphdouglas.htm


http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/zbvgBVmWTAylf904fGwy mw


http://www.thestar.co.uk/lifestyle/columnists/smith_of_the_star_the_city_ man_behind_the_great_houdini_1_305884


(true facts courtesy of @kimmyyeah)